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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
but with the res ig make of rebekah brooks on tuesday, this is a story which will run for months if not years with police investigations, judicial inquiries, lawsuits and any number of other threats still piling up against the mpany. but it's a significant day. >> the president's press conference, global implications for europe and th united states and the rupert--upert murdoch case. >>> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: storyline. it's happening every day, all across america. every time a storefront opens. or the midnight oil is burned. or when someone chases a dream, not just a dollar. they are small business owners. so if you wanna root for a real hero, support small business. shop small. additional funding provided by these funders: and by bloomberg a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. from our studiosn new york city, this is charlie rose. >> psident obama had a press conferen earlier th morning following five days of closed door meetings with top congressional leaders. at the news conference his third in three weeks the president continu
of the world" and "the sun" was a part of it. >> thank you. >> miss brooks, rupert murdoch in his evidence session said quite clearly that the responsibility for the closure of "news of the world" lay fairly and squarely with senior management of that paper, which i assume that includes you. is that the case? >> i think -- i think i may have missed that part of the evidence. i think mr. murdoch said it exactly how it was, that it was a collective decision. we all talked together. mr. murdoch was abroad at the time at a conference. we all talked together -- >> is that mr. murdoch senior? >> sorry, yes, rupert murdoch. yes. >> you wanted to say something else? >> no. sorry. >> when you were advising your staff that the paper was closing, during the private session, i think you said something like there was more to come. would you like to expand on what you meant by that? >> when i went down to the newsroom, to explain the decision, clearly and quite rightly, the journalists on the "news of the world" who very honorable journalists who have been putting out a newspaper under the scrutiny for
his first in command, rebecca brook, was sort of toeing the appropriate line. so whether there's a cover-up there that reaches the highest levels of newscorp or whether it's just the head of a company where there are problems and he's trying to fix them as best he can, i guess we'll -- we may find out. we may not find out. >> some people seem to feel it's really that connection between the rebecca brook, the "news of the world" editor, formerly, and the power that she really had in politics. and david cameron's former assistant also having worked over at the paper. that there just seems to be this coziness that is making people uncomfortable. >> well, i mean, we have the same thing in washington frankly. there's been a lot of coziness over the years. the white house press corps and the -- and government at all levels. i think that's a problem when people live and work and depend on each other for their livelihood. as the press and powerful people do. but, you know, i think murdoch is probably -- may not be the person this hits. i mean, i wonder if there's -- if there's an equiv
in parliament about it and we carry that live on c-span2. we carry rupert murdoch and rebekah brooks yesterday and we will speak about that. how do you describe to an american audience the importance of "news of the world" as the largest selling sunday newspaper in the country, and the closure of that paper? guest: it was shocking. a lot of people were shocked by the closure. it was a sudden and brutal move, and murdoch's decided that enough was enough -- murdochs decided enough was enough and they had to take this extreme step. "news of the world" set the standard for tabloid journalism. it has been a pretty low standard for recent years, but they have always been in front, always seemed to be getting the best spooks, the best gossip -- best scoops, the best gossip. "news of the world" and "the sun," the murdoch daily tabloid, were the epitaph of tabloid journalism. -- epitome of tabloid journalism the rocket. raucous, titillating tabloid journalism, which we enjoy to extan extent. host: did you know, when you were living in london, rebekah brooks at all and her work? guest: she was editor of
and gave a full and sincere apology. >> rupert and james murdoch and rebecca brooks will be forced to appear here in a committee and grill eed closelily politicians who want answers as to how all of this activity went on. one of the people who will be interrogating rebecca brooks had some tough words for her. >> i think he was inevitable. rebecca brooks has given the resignation message she should have given on day one of this scandal when nick davis of the uk "guardian" revealed milly's phone had been hacked. >> but the political dimensions continue to evolve as well. downing street has been forced to put out a list of guests that the prime minister david cameron welcomed to his country residents checkers. mo among them was the now disgraced former editor of "the news of the world." a man hired as director of communications. he visited the prime minister three months after he was forced to step down from that high profile political role. wolf? >> dan rivers in london, much more on this story coming up later. meanwhi meanwhile, libyan rebels locked in heated battle while gadhafi's
was a part of it. >> thank you. >> jim sheridan. >> miss brooks. rupert murdoch in his evidence session said quitely that the responsibility for the closure of news of the world fell fairly and swearly on senior management which i assume would include you, is that the case? >> i think i missed that part of the evidence. i think mr. murdoch said it exactly how it was. that it was a collective decision. we all talked together. mr. murdoch was abroad at the time at a conference. we all talked together. >> murdoch senior? >> yes, rupert murdoch. >> you were going to say something snels. >> no. >> when you were advising your staff the paper was closing during the private session. i think you said something like there was more to come. youl you like to expand? >> when i went down to the newsroom to explain the decision, clearly and and quite rightly the journalists on the news of the world who very honorable journalists who have been putting out the newspaper under the scrutiny for a long time and with great exclusives and great pride in their newspaper were very sad and baffled by management's de
. >>> this morning former editor of "news of the world" rebecca brooks is out of jail. meanwhile scotland yard's top cop resigned amid the phone hacking scandal in great britain. the head of the london police department, sir paul stevenson, resigned. he quit under intense pressure after it was revealed that scotland yard hired a former editor as a media consultant. that editor has also been arrested in connection with the scandal. >> i and the people who know me know that my integrity is completely intact. i may wish we'd have done some things differently, but i'll not lose any sleep over my personal integri integrity. >> british lawmakers are preparing to grill rupert and james murdoch. a parliamentary committee will question the duo about the scandal tomorrow. >>> today money will be flowing at the white house in the form of the nation's most prominent billionaires. president obama is hosting warren buffett and bill and melinda gates along with other members of the giving pledge. the giving pledge was founded by buffett and the gates family last year. it encourages america's wealthiest citizens to
? edited, by the way, at that time by rebecca brooks. they sent 20 scantily clad women to her office and had loads of photographs everywhere. they described the minister at the time as frumpy, dumpy, fat and ugly. there was humiliation as a form of coercion and then we heard yesterday, gordon brown, the former prime minister, talking about the fact that his disabled son, his son has cystic fibrosis, medical records for his son alleged by gordon brown in the house of commons yesterday, was stolen from a hospital by a criminal that he believes was working for "the sunday times" newspaper. so you have that kind of power. you have the ability to humiliate an mp and the ability to intervene in their personal life and that's why he was so forceful and powerful. i can tell you, andrea, until about three weeks ago, you couldn't count on five fingers the number of politicians who would stand up to rupert murdoch in britain because every single one of them was frightened of his influence. >> of course, gordon brown's little boy frazier is doing very well but it was at birth that that informati
summoned murdoch's son james and former "news of the world" editor rebecca brooks. >>> in london today, the parents of murdered teen milly met political leaders in parliament. salley and bob say the phone hacking investigation nuft look at politician's ties to the media, and dowlers say it fueled this. they were given false hope she was alive. it led to other disclosures of hacking or hacking attempts that reached all the way to the royal throne. >>> well, stocks are treading water today. the dow chips have been moving between positive and negative territory all morning. the dow jones down about 16 points or so. investors are perhaps taking a breather on negotiations over the debt ceiling playing out in washington. >>> president obama says there's a groundhog day feeling at the white house. he and congressional leaders immediate again today to work on a deal to raise the nation's borrowing limit. republicans are insisting on deep cuts only. the president wants to close tax loopholes as well. now, the debt ceiling deadline is three weeks from today. and so far, nobody is blinking. >>> i
this committee because they're not british citizens. but their chief executive, rebekah brooks, can be forced to come and answer questions. it's going to be fascinating next tuesday to see who turns up and what they say, and i would imagine this story will just keep rumbling all summer. now as you say, with senator jay rockefeller also getting interested in this in the states as well, this is now not only a u.k. story, it's an international story. it's a u.s. story as well because, of course, rupert murdock has interests all around the place, not just here, he's got "the wall street journal," fox news, "new york post" to name but a few. >> i want to ask you this. you mentioned rupert murdock and his son not being british citizens can't be forced to testify before parliament. what is the outcome if they do? in the united states we have a lot of people called to testify before congress, subpoenaed, they have to go. but it's unclear unless you lie to congress, what the consequences are of that. are there really consequences to this editor in chief being called before parliament? >> well, it's tr
faith. >> i think it does need to go for what it's done. >> reporter: rebekah brooks was editor a decade ago when many of the alleged crimes were committed. she gets to keep her job. and so does james murdoch who runs the british arm of the company. he, too, said it wasn't his fault. >> i acted on the advice of executives and lawyers with a completion investigation. >> reporter: as s e ultimate boss, james could face prosecution under u.s. and british business law. if convicted, jail time. >> while brooks and james murdoch knew about it or not, they're still responsible for what goes on their watch. it only adds to the misery that rupert murdoch's got to deal with this week. >> reporter: this scandal is rippling across the u.s. according to a rival tabloid, "the daily mirror," they tried to hack into the cell phones of 9/11 victims. apparently it didn't work. >> jeffery, thanks so much. >>> you know, we all know that driving while texting or talking on a cell phone is a dangerous behavior, shown in study after study. many still do it. is there any way t
phone. so he's being grilled there. and rebekah brooks is set to be grilled in this building behind me. but rupert murdoch and james murdoch are being asked to turn up. so farther either saying that they w't or can't and they have been served with the summons by the deputy sergeant of arms, which means that they are being sort of demanded that they come. it's pretty serious stuff. the problem is, because they are american citizens, no one is quite sure if they can have jurisdiction over them, forcing them to turn up or not. so there is scratching of heads there. it's completely unchartered territory and they are talking about introducing emergency laws to force them to come along. >> we're following it closely. dan rivers, thanks. >>> well, they are almost there. the u.s. women's soccer team, one win away from hoisting that world cup. they are going to face japan on sunday in the championship match after their 3-1 win yesterday against france. zain is not only watching all of the action, she's going to be there for the game and report live and give us every single detail, right? >> rep
for information. they will be joined by rebecca brooks. she is the chief executive of news international, and was the editor of nice of the world, the sunday tabloid at the time it allegedly hired a detective to hack into the voice mail of an abducted school girl who was later murdered. rupert and james murdoch initial declined to go before the committee citing prior engagements with you offering to cooperate at a later date. but a formal summons arrived, and that happened here in london. so they have decided to go. >> day by day this has become worse for them. it's engulfed them in a way and there has been a sense of meltdown around them. they have some really difficult questions to face. >> reporter: reportedly the fine has opened an investigation in the united states to determine whether or not of any news corp's entities hacked into the voicemail systems of victims of 9/11. alisyn: the debt showdown, why seniors could be at risk and what it means for the average american. we'll go in-depth. >> if you are with the president and the vision of a government that continues to live or stro
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)